Jack Donovan’s Becoming a Barbarian. Tribalism and Loyalty

I have just read Jack Donovan’s latest book; Becoming a Barbarian and thought to take this as an opportunity to recommend it wholeheartedly. One of the greatest merits of the book is actually the description of the powers to be, “The Empire of Nothing” as he puts it; a phrase often also used by Paul Waggener of Operation Werewolf. Although one might argue that too little emphasis is put on Zionist control of media and finance the analyses is still highly relevant and one I can agree on (more so seen from an economic and cultural perspective than a political though). The Empire of Nothing is a rootless, mass consumerist culture where the only loyalty is to Mammon (money) and identities can be bought and sold as commodities on the global market. Everything that is an obstacle towards unbridled consumerism is a threat, such as national and tribal identities.

Another very good point that the book raises and that everyone should take to heart (and explain to others), is the complete inability for any single human being to care about exactly everyone else in the world. Donovan brings up a solid example (imagine if you had to write down the name of every human in the world – it would take a lifetime), this illustrates quite well the inability to actually care deeply about everyone. Showing solidarity with a starving child in Africa is virtue signalling; it is impossible to feel deep sorrow for every child that is living in unfortunate circumstances.
The tribalist mindset, much like the nationalist mindset (but on a smaller scale), is about being a true friend to your tribe. Quoting Aristotle “A friend to all is a friend to none“, this makes perfect sense; if you care about everyone and if you hold everyone in the same regard you are not placing particularly much value on anyone. If everyone is the same and equal; everyone is easily replaced, and this is also endemic to the modern world; with loose loyalties and fleeting connections. As I see it there are too many guys who are investing quality time in people they will never have a deeper relationship with, and that is time that could be spent with your brothers.

Viewing your friends in a similar manner as you view your girlfriend will serve you well; you are not handing roses out to random females. You are not giving love and affection to random females that you have no connection with. You are not investing time in a girl you have no romantic interest in. Translating this into friendship (or brotherhood) terms, you should not be everyone’s friend, do not give love and loyalty towards random guys that you have no deeper shared loyalty with. Do not invest your time building a friendship with men of questionable honour.
I do not have any friends that are not a) either training in the gym or martial arts, and b) are nationalists or traditionalists. The reason for this is simple; I value myself, I value my time and whom I chose to build significant relationships with. You should also value yourself and value your time; make sure you invest it in quality people who are of a glorious mindset and who will help you grow (and make sure that you help them grow; iron sharpens iron).

Furthermore this is a good time to elaborate briefly on a mindset that is of utmost importance. Realise that you are judged not as an individual but also on whom your tribe consists of; or simply put, you are being judged on your friends. Coming to this realisation will strengthen both yourself and your tribe. Jealousy and drama has its place in a teenage girl group; amongst valiant men you must look towards the total glory of the tribe (tribe here is used as a term for social context) and thus it becomes apparent that the stronger your brothers are; the stronger you are. Also, be on the lookout for weak and decadent elements within the tribe; their weakness and vulnerability becomes your weakness.

To conclude I would like to recommend this book to all men, this is a great book if you are new to political and philosophical thought. If you have been in the game for a while there might be books that offer more insights, but as a starter book to get guys to get a more realistic and loyal world view; this is the book to start with.

 

2 Comments on “Jack Donovan’s Becoming a Barbarian. Tribalism and Loyalty

  1. Good review, about to finish “The way of Men”, also by Jack Donovan, will order this today as well.

  2. A true friend handed this book to me even before he read it. He gave me a copy of “The way of Men”, also by Jack Donovan, and it was an explosion of insight that blew my mind. “Becoming a Barbarian” is a very good follow up. I try to find the flaws in it and find myself reaching new levels of enlightenment through research. I feel that this would have been a great guide when I was a 20 something.

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